Bono Remembers The Real “Bloody Sunday”

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cbsbono Bono Remembers The Real Bloody Sunday

It took 38 years, but Ireland finally got an apology from England for the “Bloody Sunday” massacre in Derry. As one would expect for Ireland’s unofficial ambassador to the world, [lastfm]U2[/lastfm] frontman [lastfm]Bono[/lastfm] took time out of his recooperation from back surgery to pen an op-ed for the New York Times about what that apology means to his country.

Find out all about it – and a funny little sidebar – after the jump.

Bloody Sunday was, “the day when my father stopped taking our family across the border to Ulster because, as he said, the ‘Nordies have lost their marbles,’ Bono wrote.

But while one might expect bitterness at the delayed “justice,” Bono chose another path – one of healing.

“Healing is kind of a corny word but it’s peculiarly appropriate here; wounds don’t easily heal if they are not out in the open,” he added.

Healing is an important word for [lastfm]U2[/lastfm] fans currently; the band had to postpone its US dates from June 3rd through July 19th, including shows at Angel Stadium in Anaheim earlier this month.

A bonus from the op-ed, from the man himself:

U2 is in a studio in Dublin, playing its new song, ‘Sunday Bloody Sunday,’ to the record company. The melody is a good one but the lyric is, in hindsight, an inarticulate speech of the heart. It’s a small song that tries but fails to contrast big ideas … atonement with forgiveness … ‘Bloody Sunday’ with Easter Sunday. The song will be sung wherever there are rock fans with mullets and rage, from Sarajevo to Tehran. Over time, the lyric will change and grow. But here, with the Cockneyed record company boss at the song’s birth, the maternity ward goes quiet when the man announces that the baby is ‘a hit’… with one caveat: ‘Drop the ‘bloody.’ ‘Bloody’ won’t bloody work on the radio.’


[Source: Rolling Stone]

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