John Lennon Letter Urges Young Musician to ‘Imagine No Possessions’

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 John Lennon Letter Urges Young Musician to Imagine No Possessions

The British postal system may only “get by with a little help from a friend” called the Queen, but 40 years is way too long for an inspirational missive from the venerable [lastfm]John Lennon [/lastfm]to an aspiring folk singer to go missing. Did the postman get distracted by a four decade long tea-time or was some [lastfm]Beatles[/lastfm] stalker responsible for the missing note?

Most likely the letter was intercepted in 1971 at the offices of the now defunct ZigZag Magazine while en route to [lastfm]John Lennon[/lastfm]’s youthful musical prodigy [lastfm]Steve Tilston[/lastfm].  The letter, which is estimated to be worth about $11,000, was “missing” until an American collector contacted Tilston 5 years ago to verify it’s validity.

In the letter, Lennon (with the help of [lastfm]Yoko Ono[/lastfm], of course) plays his role of guru very well.  He basically admonishes the necessity of material goods to the young Tilston:

Being rich doesn’t change your experiences in the way you think. The only difference, basically, is that you don’t have you worry about money — food — roof etc. But all other experiences — emotions — relationships — are the same as anybodies. I know, I have been rich and poor and so has Yoko (rich – poor – rich). So, whadya think of that. Love John and Yoko.

So, whaddya think of that, [lastfm]Steve Tilston[/lastfm]? With a little research we found that [lastfm]Steve Tilston[/lastfm] has actually become a very talented and relatively successful singer-songwriter–sans the help of [lastfm]John Lennon[/lastfm]’s encouraging words.

Here he is performing a song called “Madam Muse.”  Perhaps [lastfm]John Lennon[/lastfm] was his “Mister Muse?”

We’ll write Tilston a letter and tell you what he says 40 years from now.

[Source: Spinner]

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