The Modern Superhero- A Bad Role Model?

robert downey jr iron man 2 jay leno The Modern Superhero  A Bad Role Model?

The classic comic book hero gave little boys someone to look up to, a role model that stood up for “justice, fairness and decency” against forces of evil. But are the heroes of today actually the villains?

A professor at the University of Massachusetts in Boston is developing an argument that would certainly point in that direction. Professor Sharon Lamb believes the new class of superhero is far from a good role model, claiming that most stand for “mindless aggression and rampant sexism.” Are characters like Iron Man planting seeds of macho-aggression in the male youth?

Lamb, surveyed 674 boys ages 4-18… and concluded with her findings that these “hard-nosed heroes” may be damaging the social skills of teenagers and even affecting their performance at school.

Pointing the finger at the new generation of superheroes, exemplified in her eyes by Robert Downey Junior’s playboy Iron Man, of being bad role models for young boys. Lamb uses Superman as an example of a positive and acceptable superhero–who she argues is a good role model because he is an ordinary man (with flaws ) with extraordinary powers.

“Because outside of their costumes they were real people with real problems and many vulnerabilities,” she said. Lamb told the Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association in San Diego, California that young boys are being sold a “narrow version of masculinity” during a vulnerable and impressionable stage in their development.  A time when they are searching for an identity for themselves.  She went on to say:

There is a big difference in the movie superhero of today and the comic book superhero of yesterday. Today’s superhero is too much like an action hero who participates in non-stop violence; he’s aggressive, sarcastic, and rarely speaks to the virtue of doing good for humanity. These men, like Iron Man, exploit women, flaunt bling and convey their manhood with high-powered guns.

Is today’s superhero rotting the brains of the youth… or trying to keep up with a competitive box office? There must be other outlets young boys can seek out when forming their identity. Could young men ever really use superheros as a template of the “masculine form?”  We are talking about fictional characters with ripped six packs and flying powers!!! Right?

Tell us what you think about the Professor’s argument… maybe this is her audition for the next super villain in the Iron Man series!

[Source:  ONTD]

  • JJ

    ?? You know, if everyone took absolutely everything as ultra serious as this guy (I’m sure there are a s!*% load of politicians currently elected that do), then I don’t understand why all magazines, radio, TV, and all other forms of communication are not baned also. It’s entertainment for crying out loud! I don’t go to the movies to work. If I want to learn, I get a book and read, or go take a class. So, it’s not reality. Isn’t that part of going to a movie, checking out for a while and just being entertained? If kids don’t understand the difference, then why aren’t their parents explaining it? the American Psychological Association? Wasn’t there an instance where a bunch of these guys got stuck in an elevator someplace, and were all so panicked and traumatized by the time it was unstuck, they all had to be admitted a to mental ward? What would these same people say about the movie “Inception”? Are we “only living in a dream”, or is it reality? It doesn’t sound to me like this guy has enough productive “reality” in his life if he has time to worry about things like this.

  • jim

    Oh my goddess, i take it this professors never read the early ironman comic. Or when tony stark had his problems and recovery from them.

  • lars

    Sharon Lamb, “SHE” said it all.

blog comments powered by Disqus
Best Of Los Angeles
Flashback Lunch

Listen Live